Current Events

Current Events

Daylight Savings

We all know how precious our sleep is, and how much we would hate to lose a whole hour of sleep. Well, daylight saving time just passed and marked the 100th anniversary of daylight saving time starting. This last Sunday, March 11th, is the day we sprung forward, at 2 A.M. We set our clocks ahead (on phones they set automatically) one hour, and then in the fall, we set them back one hour at 2 A.M. We do this on the second Sunday of March and the first Sunday in November every year. Approximately 70 countries do not shift their clocks in March and November, though, and neither does Arizona or Hawaii. Daylight saving time is supposedly tied to energy policy (the manner in which a given entity has decided to address issues of energy development including energy production, distribution and consumption). It also helps people around the world save money by giving us more daylight to complete tasks, so we don’t need to use lights. Daylight saving time was first proposed by George Hudson in 1895, but was mainly only used during World War I and World War II. Daylight saving time was officially adopted by the United States of America in 1918. Happy 100th anniversary of saving daylight!